Tuesday, May 30, 2006

TangoOSU newsletter: moving to Hayes Hall tonight, Milonga, etc.


Milongueras, Milongueros,


A few changes: until further notice, we are meeting at HAYES HALL lobby on TUESDAYS, starting today, FRIDAYS and SATURDAYS, and as usual at ROYER on WEDNESDAYS and SUNDAYS. HAYES HALL is not only nicer looking, but is also airconditioned. So, our timetable is as follows:

TUESDAYS 7pm ROBERT at HAYES HALL, Progressive Beginners, $5/$7.

WEDNESDAYS FRANCESCO at ROYER, 7pm Intermediate, 8pm Beginners, $5/$7.

FRIDAYS 9pm ROBERT at HAYES HALL, Progressive Beginners, $5/$7.

SATURDAYS 8pm ALICE&LUCIA at HAYES HALL, Beginners Salon Style, $4/$5.

SUNDAYS FRANCESCO at ROYER, 5:15pm Beginners I, $5; 6pm Beginners II, $5/$7; 7pm Intermediate, $5/$7.

Francesco & Pam will be giving a WORKSHOP on Saturday, JUNE 3rd. If you are interested in beginners' material (to improve your own skills, or to learn how to teach/help beginners in the future), this will be a great opportunity. For more information, please email: tcyinyang@aol.com

La MILONGA BUCKEYE is next held at ROYER, JUNE 11, 8:15pm, to celebrate the end of the academic year. Pizza, soft drinks, and background material - do not miss the fun!

See you on the dance floor!

PS. New photos are posted on the homepage, http://tango.osu.edu, click on "Photos1", and anyway the graphics are improved there.
PPS. As a Vaishnavaite, I thought I'd say the picture in the blog (http://tangoosu.blogspot.com) indicates Tango is not danced alone.

Saturday, May 27, 2006

La Milonga Buckeye tonight!

I intended to make a short list of Milongueros, but this might be interpreted as being exclusive - which we are not: we are friendly, relaxed and informal! But let me remind us all that La MILONGA BUCKEYE will take place tonight, 9:15pm, at the lobby of HAYES HALL. This nice looking space, at the home of the Dept. of Art and Art History, is near the Wexner center. A photo (taken last night, after Robert's lesson) and a map can be found at the homepage: http://tango.osu.edu (which has now images of our instructors); $1. There are armchairs for those who wish to rest between dances, soft drinks and a little innovation (if I get my equipment to work). All are welcome!

At 8pm Lucia&I hold a Beginners lesson, basic steps for a Milonga, to learn basic moves of social dancing and actually be able to dance, Salon style, (UG: $3)$4/$5.


See you on the dance floor, tonight!

Added Sunday May 28, the "morning after": we had a great party, photos are on the homepage, click on the Hayes Hall thumbnail, or directly: http://tango.osu.edu/hayes.html

Wednesday, May 24, 2006

Robert beginners class in a video-clip

This can be found on http://tango.osu.edu, ask me for the precise location if you want to view it.

Tuesday, May 23, 2006

TangoOSU newsletter: Hayes Hall, Milonga, Francesco, Robert, Blog


Milongueras, Milongueros,


Let me start with the timetable this week. Please do note change in location Friday and Saturday!

Tonight, TUESDAY 7pm, ROBERT teaches ALL LEVELS at SCARLET K, basement of the OHIO UNION, $5/$7. I'll post videos of Robert's lesson as soon as I learn to do it, maybe tonight.

WEDNESDAY, FRANCESCO resumes at ROYER, 7pm Intermediate, 8pm Beginners, $5/$7.

FRIDAY, ROBERT, 9pm, all levels, at HAYES HALL lobby, $5/$7.

SATURDAY 8pm LUCIA&I beginners at HAYES HALL lobby. Reduced prices: $3/$4/$5 for UG/Grads/adults. This lesson is for Beginners, to learn basic moves of social dancing and actually be able to dance, salon style.

La MILONGA BUCKEYE: 9:15pm, at HAYES HALL lobby, $1.

SUNDAY FRANCESCO at ROYER, 5:15pm Beginners I, $5; 6pm Beginners II, 7pm Intermediate, $5/$7.

HAYES HALL is on the Oval near the Wexner center, the home of the dept of Art and History of Art, and the lobby is accordingly beautiful. For map click on http://tango.osu.edu , updated as soon as I can.

I am planning on sending a Milonga reminder to a short list on Friday, as this mailing list probably contains many who lost interest in Tango. Write to tango@osu.edu if u want to be on the short list.

I don't have much to add to the comment on the Blog http://tangoosu.blogspot.com on Sunday's lessons: " Anonymous said... What a great lesson! Such great fun! So wonderful to have you back Francesco and Pam!"

In many communities they need to continuously bring outside teachers. We are so fortunate to have an ever fresh stream of ideas!

I posted on http://tangoosu.blogspot.com an entry on ROBERT's original MATRIX METHOD, in which I believe. Having a structured method helps to learn efficiently. Such methods, e.g. Discovery, by Mauricio Castro, proved very successful: http://www.le-tango.com/frameset.htm special events, or http://www.tangodiscovery.com/TD2/English/Index.htm We have it all here already!

Do come to the MILONGA! This will not be a formal Milonga. Rather, we are relaxed: whoever wishes also to improve and learn will have the room for that: HAYES HALL beautiful lobby is split in two by a huge antique table, and the arches add ottoman flavor.


See you on the dance floor!

Monday, May 22, 2006

MATRIX TANGO with ROBERTO


I am Robert and it is time to accelerate into new possibilities.
It is time to dance, it is time to Matrix Tango. The MATRIX TANGO method is my own creation, developed by me. You will not find it anywhere else. It is a development of the Discovery method of Mauricio Castro. It will lead you to learn everything you need to know to be able to dance with anybody, anywhere, at any time. And at the most efficient way.

MATRIX TANGO is based on three parts:
-Awareness
-Structure
-Musicality

AWARENESS

Basic awareness is based on primal instincts.


For example, survival in our surroundings, balance and unbalance, using our spine as our center axis, and using it to respond to our primal instincts. For example, if whom I am dancing with is moving toward me, either to the left or right of my spine, I allow my upper body to fall backwards, in order to provide space for my partner. If I don't do this, I will either fall down or cause excessive strain on my back. Also, part of awareness is to be sure that I have full articulation of my joints at any given time. At the same time, I am using the full range of movement that my body will allow, and developing my hypersensitivity.


STRUCTURE

Structure is the heart of the Matrix method.


It provides every possibility that is plausible. Tango is based on three forms: front cross, open step, and back cross; two systems: cross foot, and parallel foot; and two directions: parallel, and contrary. Once all possibilities are known, I add seven elements: parada, barrida, sacada, gancho, trapada, volcada and colgada.


MUSICALITY

Musicality is based on timing and rhythm.


First I look at the timing, meaning what happens and when. Then rhythm is what happens and when, to the music. We have three options: with it, against it, and without it. Then we combine these two elements to create themes in the music, with the same three options.

Now why would anyone want to learn with the Matrix Tango method?

The Matrix Tango method uses the highest level of communication: Alphabetizing.

Why should you care? "I am happy learning patterns from my teacher." But this sounds very complicated! You should care because Tango can be danced two ways: choreographed, or improvised. The choreographed version uses the awareness to be more intuned to your primal instincts of movement. The structure will allow more possibilities, and to change anything. The musicality is used to build themes that are your creations. The improvised version uses the awareness to focus on balance and weight change in order to lead every step using primal instincts. The structure is the same as the choreographed version and so are the benefits of musicality. Learning patterns is the easiest way to learn. But, you must beg you teacher for another pattern. Your teacher now becomes your feudal master, which makes you a slave to what he or she wants and not what you want. Also, learning becomes very, very slow. Almost everyone I teach says it sounds complicated to learn steps. When the students do the Matrix method, in two to three weeks they are well past anyone else; they are further in skill, sensitivity, and knowledge, than any dancer anywhere.


I am Robert and now is the time to accelerate into new possibilities: it is time to dance; it is time for Matrix Tango.


Tuesdays 7:00pm at Scarlet K room of the Ohio Union, students $5, others $7

Fridays 9pm at Memorial Room of the Ohio Union, $5/$7

Details: http://tango.osu.edu, tango@osu.edu

Sunday, May 21, 2006

Classes Resume with Francesco & Pam

Yes, Francesco and Pam are back! Please welcome them back by joining our Sunday and Wednesday classes.

SUNDAYS
Beginner 1: 5:15 pm
$5

Beginner 2: 6:00 pm
$5/7

Intermediate: 7:00 pm
$5/7
WEDNESDAYS
Intermediate: 7:00 pm $5/7
Beginner: 8:00 pm $5/7

******WORKSHOP INFO******

Francesco & Pam will also be giving a WORKSHOP on Saturday, JUNE 3rd. If you are interested in beginners' material (to improve your own skills, or to learn how to teach/help beginners in the future), this will be a great opportunity. For more information, please email: tcyinyang@aol.com


Saturday, May 20, 2006

Saturday's class and Practica


SATURDAYS at MEMORIAL, 8pm, Lucia & I teach Tango Fundamentals. In this class we concentrate on key steps of social dancing, to improve & refine them. Salon style.
PRICES: $7, students $5; undergrads may pay only $3.

SATURDAYS ACTIVE PRACTICA at MEMORIAL, 9:15pm, FREE May 20! We introduce a new idea modeled on the Mr. Roger's Sunday Practica, Cambridge, MA. The purpose is for dancers to practice to improve their movement by advising each other how to do things better. Or what not to do. In Cambridge, first rate dancers come to improve their performance. In many dozens. Here, people who feel they are already perfect are welcome just to dance, and tell their partner "no criticism please". But I would prefer to dance with people who wish to develop. This Saturday I propose for beginners to work on what they know, and for others to work on our Barridas and Vocadas.

For the BOSTON TANGO FESTIVAL of the TANGO SOCIETY OF BOSTON and the MIT TANGO CLUB, June 14-18, click http://tango.osu.edu/Boston.gif

Wednesday, May 17, 2006

Monday, May 15, 2006

TangoOSU newsletter: ROBERT free lesson Tuesday 5/16, lessons, Saturday free Practica, Francesco returns...


Milongueras, Milongueros,


It is my pleasure to introduce a new class by ROBERT on TUESDAYS.
First class, May 16, is FREE!
Use this opportunity to get to meet this fancy NuevoTanguero.

Location: SCARLET K room of the OHIO UNION (not at Memorial). First lesson May 16, 8:30pm. Then: 7pm. An ad is at http://tango.osu.edu/robert.html or click Robert left column of http://tango.osu.edu

WEDNESDAYS @ROYER, 7pm Intermediates, 8pm Beginners, May 17 with ROBERT - don't miss this amazing dancer!

FRIDAYS@MEMORIAL, 9pm, ROBERT, Progressive Beginners

SATURDAYS @ MEMORIAL, 8pm, Lucia & I teach Tango Fundamentals. In this class we concentrate on key steps of social dancing, to improve & refine them.
PRICES: students who wish to pay only $3 are welcome to do so - no questions asked!

SATURDAYS ACTIVE PRACTICA @ MEMORIAL, 9:15pm, FREE May 20! We introduce a new idea modeled on the Mr.Roger's Sunday Practica, Cambridge, MA. The purpose is for dancers to work to improve their movement by advising each other how to do things better. Or what not to do. In Cambridge, first rate dancers come to improve their performance. In many dozens. Here, people who feel they are already perfect are welcome just to dance, and tell their partner "no criticism please". But I would prefer to dance with people who wish to develop. This Saturday I propose for beginners to work on what they know, and for others to work on our Barridas and Vocadas.

SUNDAYS @ ROYER we welcome FRANCESCO back: 5:15pm Beginners I $5, 6pm Beginners II, 7pm Intermediate, $5/$7.

Workshop 5/20 is full.

There will be a Workshop by FRANCESCO June 3, 5084 N. High st., see http://tango.osu.edu/frantc.html

The calendar is now on the right column of http://tango.osu.edu - updated as usual.

MEMORIAL Room is 2nd floor, SCARLET K is basement, of the OHIO UNION, 1739 N. High St. Park at the Ohio Union garage OR east of N. High st.

ROYER North Room, 85 Curl Drive, park on LANE Ave. on Sundays. On other days after 6pm park on N. High st., north of Lane, at the free meters.


To be added to or removed from the TangoOSU mailing list write to tango@osu.edu

See you on the dance floor,
Yuval

Thursday, May 11, 2006

Filma & Quiiiize


Today's blog is a short one.

Here is an addition to the film list (except I don't know where you can get it... Does anybody know? It's not available on Amazon.). The picture on the left is from the film.


LA CONFITERIA IDEAL: THE TANGO SALON

Jana Bokova (2003)
Argentina/Britain
Language: Spanish (70 min.)

A little fun stuff. I found a quiz on the history of Argentine tango on BBC's website. Here is the link to the quiz.

Monday, May 08, 2006

TangoOSU Newsletter: new classes, Freudian La Milonga Buckeye, Workshop



Tangueras, Tangueros,


This Newsletter will be posted regularly also here at our Blog: http://tangoosu.blogspot.com/

The webpage: http://tango.osu.edu/ is my safest way to communicate with you and update in a timely fashion. I also reply to my email very frequently - do not hesitate to use it! You can also use the anonymous comment form on the homepage, but do specify your email if you want an answer.

La MILONGA BUCKEYE: this Saturday, May 13, 9:30pm, at MEMORIAL, students $1, others $3, free to those who took the 8pm class. We are celebrating the 150 birthday of SIGMUND FREUD, the first Tanguero (of the mind), with only a few days delay. We expect Julio, and some new idea.

CLASSES: We add TUESDAYS, ROBERT, 7pm at SCARLET K room of the Ohio Union (same bldg as Memorial, but NOT at Memorial). All prices will be: students $5, others $7, except Sunday 5:15, $5.

We change WEDNESDAYS: ROBERT will teach at ROYER, $5/$7: 7pm Beginners; 8pm Intermediate.

FRIDAYS: ROBERT teaches at MEMORIAL, 9pm, Progressive Beginners, $5/$7.

SATURDAYS: LUCIA&I teach 8pm at MEMORIAL, $5/$7. This wknd we continue with La MILONGA BUCKEYE at 9:30pm. I'll try some new Bostonian ideas.

SUNDAYS at ROYER: 5:15pm, LUCIA&I, BeginnersI, $5.
6pm, LUCIA&I, BeginnersII, $5/$7.
7pm, ROBERT, Progressive Beginners, $5/$7.

WORKSHOPS: SATURDAY MAY 20, 2-6pm, MEMORIAL Rm, LUCIA&I would hold a BEGINNERS WORKSHOP. Prepaid: students $20, others $25; at the door: $25/$30. To register email tango@osu.edu: we would like to know in advance who are the participants to prepare what is best suitable for them. No partner necessary; no previous Tango experience assumed. See: http://tango.osu.edu/flierws.html

This Workshop is an opportunity for beginners to get beyond the first few steps and learn enough to be able to move on the dance floor. We shall concentrate on basic steps commonly used by dancers in milongas (Tango parties) everywhere which are also useful for your further progress. Our emphasize will be on mastery and refinement of these steps. We also introduce Vals & Milonga. This workshop is part of an ongoing attempt to increase the size of the practicing Tango community in the capital of the Buckeye state.

There will be a Workshop by FRANCESCO June 3, 5084 N. High st., see http://tango.osu.edu/frantc.html

The calendar is now on the right column of http://tango.osu.edu - updated as usual.

MEMORIAL Room is 2nd floor, SCARLET K is basement, of the OHIO UNION, 1739 N. High St. Park at the Ohio Union garage OR east of N. High st.

ROYER North Room, 85 Curl Drive, park on LANE Ave. on Sundays. On other days after 6pm park on N. High st., north of Lane, at the free meters.


To be added to or removed from the TangoOSU mailing list write to tango@osu.edu

See you on the dance floor,
Yuval

Boston Tango Festival Major Discount for Students!!


Dear fellow tango students,

The Boston Tango Society and MIT Tango Club is presenting the 3rd annual Boston Tango Festival between 14-18 June. There will be a HUGE discount -- 50% for any students. Therefore, please spread the words to your club member about this information and the MIT Tango Club board would love to help out when any student-groups across the country.

This festival will feature multiple workshops with World-Renowned Masters from Argentina and Multiple La Milongas, some with live music, and a Surprise to be announced. All Details can be found at the BOSTON TANGO FESTIVAL WEBSITE (see Link Below).

Note: SOME AREAS OF THE FESTIVAL WEBSITE WILL BE UPDATED, INCLUDING ARTISTS, REGISTRATION AND LINKS AREA, SO CHECK IT OFTEN.

http://www.bostontangofestival.com/home.htm

Registeration will open soon!

On behalf of the MIT Tango Club,
Shu-Yee

MIT Tango Club
Come Dance With Us...
Website:
www.mit.edu/~tango
E-mail: tango@mit.edu
For further information contact: tango@mit.edu

Friday, May 05, 2006

Message from Jessica: Modern Dance this wknd:


We are currently in Production and have a show this week-end at Columbus Dance Theatre. It's called Anna and the Annadroids. It's a wild and crazy Modern Dance Extravaganza with multi media and I would love it if you would tell every-one about it. It is at 8 on Fri. and Sat. and Sun @ 2.

Thursday, May 04, 2006

Films


I don't know if everyone has read the last weekly message (and I'm far less sure if anybody is reading this at all...), but I introduced a book called Tango: the Art History of Love in it. Since I brought it up, I guess I should blog it a little. Here is an excerpt from Chapter 1, entitled, "Tango in Hollywood" (If you would like to read more, this site has the excerpt.):

The history of tango tangles with Hollywood. Tango on film is a chronicle of its own, lurid and strange, mixing dreams and deceptions. Often a tango augments a star—Rudolph Valentino, Marlon Brando, Madonna, Al Pacino—not for its sake but for theirs. And the accord with the tango is always with stereotype: sadness, sex, violence, and doom.

[skip]

The trend toward the real article includes the conversion of a major star of film, Robert Duvall, who makes pilgrimages to Buenos Aires and frequents traditional dance halls. He takes lessons from masters like the late Lampazo, Danel and Maria Bastone of New York, and Juan Carlos Copes, the latter described by Duvall as a “Rolls-Royce without a speedometer.”

A Buenos Aires television special cuts to a dance floor where Duvall sits enthralled with his girlfriend, studying the moves. Early in 2000 Duvall danced tango for President Bill Clinton and the president of Argentina in the White House—at the express request of the Argentine ambassador.On March 28, 2003, Duvall released his own tango film, Assassination Tango. It had cameo appearances by major tango dancers like María Nieves, Milena Plebs, Los Hermanos Macana, Pablo Verón, and Gerardo Portalea. We’ve come a long way from Valentino.

Thompson recalls older films, such as "Blood and Sand" (1922), in which Valentino plays, "Gilda"(1946), "Some Like It Hot" (1959) and "Last Tango in Paris" (1972), and basically makes a point that these Hollywood movies didn't portray what tango is about, to say the least. Another film that has a tango scene which Thompson seems to favour is "Soldier of Orange," (1977) a Dutch film about WWII. I don't know if Thompson discusses other films later in the chapter, but here are some tango-related films I could find:
  • El Tango Es Una Historia (1984)
  • Tango Bar (1988)
  • Tango: Baile Nuestro [Tango: Our Dance] (1994)
  • Tango: Obsession (1998)
  • Tango Magic (1999)
  • Café Tango (2001)
  • Blue Tango in Buenos Aires (2004) ~ (This is a documentary/interviews, but it is about Tango)
  • Tango, un giro extraño (2005)

There are many more probably, but these are relatively recent ones oriented toward the history of tango or the dance itself as opposed to the ones that are not really about tango but have one or two tango scenes. I don't guarantee that they are truer to Argentine tango, however. If you have watched any of these films or know other films, please leave your comments.

[The excerpt of Tango: the Art History of Love is from http://www.powells.com]

Wednesday, May 03, 2006

Tango Dancing Styles



Tango Canyengue, Tango Liso, Tango Orillero
(before 1940s)

Tango Canyengue refers to a style of Tango danced until the 1920s. Reportedly, the long tight fashion in dresses of that era restricted the follower's movements. Consequently, the style involves short steps. The dancers tend to move with knees slightly bent, the partners slightly offset, and in a closed embrace. The style tends to be danced to a 2/4
time signature. As the Cayengue style was mostly not danced in ballrooms, but in taverns and on the street, the typical soft feet movements with close contact to the ground were not possible, leading to a more "hopping" style.

Tango Liso developed in small and crowded dance halls, where there was only space to take a few paces before having to circle around each other, waiting for a space to open. The style is danced with an upright posture, usually with each dancer slightly offset to the right of their partner. If a close embrace is used, it is relaxed to allow the follower to perform turns. The dance involves just the simpler steps-- decorative moves such as boleos, ganchos, and sentadas are absent from the style.

Tango Orillero is thought to have developed away from the town centers, in the outskirts and suburbs where there was more freedom due to more available space on the dance floor. The style is danced in an upright position and uses various embellishments including rapid foot moves, kicks, and even some acrobatics, though this is a more recent development.




Salon and Milonguero Tango
(1940s till today)

Salon Tango developed in the less crowded up-market dance halls, allowing space for boleos, ganchos, and sentadas to be performed. The style is generally danced in an open embrace.

Tango Milonguero developed in the 1940s and 50s in closely packed dance halls and "confiterias", so it is danced in close embrace, chest-to chest, with the partners leaning - or appearing to lean - slightly towards each other to allow space for the feet to move. There are not many embellishments or firuletes or complicated figures for the lack of space. Although the rhythmic, close-embrace style of dancing has existed for decades, the term "Milonguero Style" only surfaced in the mid- '90s.



Nuevo and Fantasia/Show Tango
(1990s till today)

Tango Nuevo is a dancing and teaching style. Tango Nuevo as a teaching style emphasizes a structural analysis of the dance in which previously unexplored combinations of steps and new figures can be found. By taking tango down to the physics of the movements in a systematic way, dancers explore the complete set of possibilities of tango movements, defined by two bodies and four legs moving in walks or circles. In walks, their explorations pioneered what were once called "alterations" and are now called "changes of direction". In turns, they focus on being very aware of where the axis of the turn is (in the follower/in the leader/in between them). This tends to produce a flowing style, with the partners rotating around each other on a constantly shifting axis, or else incorporating novel changes of direction. Tango Nuevo is often misunderstood and mislabeled as "Show Tango" because a large percentage of today's stage dancers have adopted "tango nuevo" elements in their choreographies.

Show Tango, also called Fantasia, is a more theatrical and exaggerated form of Argentine tango developed to suit the stage. It includes many embellishments, acrobatics, and solo moves. Unlike other forms of tango, stage tango is not improvised and is rather choreographed and practiced to a predetermined piece of music.



From http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Argentine_Tango




A Brief History of Tango



Etymology: The word "tango" may have come from many African languages where it means "closed space," "reserved ground"--in Africa today it appears as a place name in Angola and Mali. It could also be a derivation from the Portuguese tangere: to touch--and therefore it could have reached the Western hemisphere through Portuguese slave ships with slave-trading connection in San Tome` (Gulf of Guinea). In this case the word was picked up by slaves from their captors. No matter what the origins are, Tango acquired the standard meaning of "place" where the African slaves got together for dancing throughout the Spanish American empire. Later in the 18th century, black dancers in general were given the name of Tango.

The music and the dance: Tango started as a fusion of African slave dance (candombe) and milonga (a bastardization of polka): the compadritos observed the African-Argentine steps and movements and blended them into their own traditional polka and mazurka. Approximately around 1850s, "milonga became a mockery of the dance the blacks hold in their own places."

Prior to the 1920s Tango music and dance was defined as The “Old Guard” style: the instrumentation was simpler, the tempo slightly faster and the social context firmly set in the old barrios where 'disreputable' men would dance with each other in the streets for practice while awaiting admission to the taverns. Tango moved out of the barrios and arrabales when the wealthy youth started "slumming" and taking part occasionally in the compadritos’ gathering. The dance started its progress towards the center of the city by becoming a grandiose form of entertainment in all brothels and also in the high class brothels close to the center of the city. It also became synonymous of moral corruption for the upper Argentine class.

The “New Guard” style: Between 1916 and 1920 with the closing of the bordellos Tango migrated to cafes, cabarets and dance halls. By 1918 a few key composers were writing original Tango lyrics, often as poetry rather than music. Picked up by a rising generation of new singers, the consciously melancholic tone of much of this new writing became a key component in what would become the 'New Guard' style, typified by Francisco Canaro, Julio DeCaro and, most especially, Carlos Gardel.

Each wave of immigrants contributed to the re-making of Tango dance, music, and lyrics. Italian immigrants, some of them key figures in political and upper class social scenes, took charge of the dance and cleaned it up. They embraced the dance by softening its rough edges and making it suitable to dance in their homes and social gatherings: Italians would dance Tango liso (smooth tango) with their wives and sweethearts in their very proper low, middle, and upper class settings. They introduced the use of the accordion and the mandolin. (The Tango liso evolved into ballroom Tango.) German Immigrants introduced the use of the most representative instrument of Tango, the Bandeon: a German-made squeezebox instrument--extremely difficult to play. Jewish immigrants introduced the use of the violin.

In the 1910s we see the first Tango recordings and orchestras: from the traditional number of three musicians to six; from one bandeon, one violin, one guitar to two bandeons, two violins, one piano and one flute (orchestra tipica). In 1913-14 Tango invaded Paris and London through the high, smart society: wealthy Argentinean lived in Europe and gave parties to which the local nobility was invited. Soon Tango became a craze all over Europe giving life to the phenomenon called the “Tangomania of the 1920s.” Tango was liberating for women (it allowed unprecedented freedom of movement) and seductive for men (it glamorized the image of the latin lover; Rodolfo Valentino introduced it to Hollywood later). Tango influenced fashion in clothing with Satin Tango (yellow/orange silk) and Jupes Culottes (pants for women); new fashion in perfume: Nirvana and Sakountala (sandalwood and patchouli); new fashion in French cuisine: la banane tango, le peche melba, and le gateau tango. Because of this newly acquired fame, upper class society embraced the dance back in Argentina, provided that it was "cleaned up" of its most transgressive steps.

The “Post-New Guard” style: While the war in Europe interrupted Tango appreciation during the first half of the 1940s, in Argentina a “post-new-guard” style was starting to gain ground, pioneered by Anabal Troilo, an extraordinary bandoneon player who increased the size of the classic Tango orchestra, and introduced a new level of aggressiveness that laid the foundations for the Nuevo Tango style of Piazzola. This new sub-style occurred roughly parallel with the emergence and duration of the Peron dictatorship, politicising the Tango. By 1955, when Peronism was collapsing, and American culture and Rock 'n' Roll was invading Latin America, Tango suffered; it was considered politically incorrect and definitely unhip. By 1960 the style was confined to the backwaters of Argentine culture. However, it was revived by artists like Piazzola who, angered by social and political events, became intensely patriotic and deeply committed to the rescuing of the 'National' music. Piazzola played often outside Argentina and developed an austere, pare-military approach that caused controversy around him still lasting today (he died in1992).


I am fully aware of the fact that the above is a very concise rendering of the origins and evolution of Tango and I apologise for the omission of many important names and facts. I wanted to offer a quick introduction to the dance and the music in order to encourage our readers to read further on their own.

Tuesday, May 02, 2006

TangoOSU Newsletter: Milongas, Classes, Blog, Workshops


Contents:
1) Next La Milonga Buckeye (and another)
2) Class Schedules (No Saturday May 6th; new Tuesday/Robert class starting May 9, 7pm)
3) Tango Blog
4) A Book about the History of Argentine Tango
5) A Workshop with Lucia & Yuval
6) A Workshop with Francesco & Pam


********
1) Next LA MILONGA BUCKEYE (and another)

Our next milonga will take place on Saturday, May 13th, 9:15pm, at Memorial in Ohio Union. I hope to see many people to dance and enjoy good conversations with. There will hopefully be a surprise guest, Julio, who dances "with much experience, virtuosity and grace", and a surprise idea.

We are planning to hold another milonga on May 27th at Memorial too.

2) Class Schedules
>>>Please check http://tango.osu.edu as always.

WEDNESDAY with Jon Devlin at Royer
Beginners at 7:00pm
Intermediates at 8:00pm
(Students $5, Others $15 first lesson, $10 any further class)

FRIDAY with Robert at Memorial
Progressive Beginners at 9:00pm
(Students $5, Others $7)

SATURDAY: there will be NO CLASS this week, Saturday May 6th.
But other classes are as scheduled:

SUNDAY May 7th with Robert this week, at Royer
NO CLASS at 5:15pm
Beginners at 6:00pm
Intermediates at 7:00pm
(Students $5, Others $7)

Someone who attended John Devlin's class gave us a very nice feedback:

"Jon Devlin's class this past Wednesday was informative and enjoyable to say the least. Jon provided us with some historical background about tango styles that made the process of learning much easier and interesting. He expressed the importance of developing a deep sensibility and a sense of refinement in order to avoid performing the steps mechanically--"we must dance from our heart" he said. Jon paid close attention to the students, and gave suggestions that catered to their needs. His focus on the elegance of body movement shows Jon's love for Argentine tango and commitment to excellent teaching."

Yuval expresses his gratitude to Robert for replacing him on the May 7 Sunday 6pm class, and recommends to the students to savour Robert's virtuousity.

Speaking of Robert, he starts next week, May 9, a new class on Tuesdays, 7pm, at SCARLET K room of the Ohio Union (NOT at Memorial). Please check http://tango.osu.edu

3) Tango Blog

Yes, we have finally launched an arena to blog! (If you don't know what BLOG is, check http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blog) This is a way to connect to each one of you through our love of Tango. Please share your thoughts/comments or stop by any blog postings just to say hello: http://tangoosu.blogspot.com/ There is a link on the homepage: http://tango.osu.edu I have already posted a couple, so please check them out!

4) A Book about the Art History of Argentine Tango


As the person who commented on Jon Devlin's class, historical & cultural knowledge of Argentine Tango could deepen your experience of dancing. There is a book called Tango: the Art History of Love by Robert F. Thompson which has been recently published. Maybe you know it already from the show on NPR (Afropop) the other day? If not, you can read the entire (I think...) interview with Thompson to sneak-peek at what it's about at Afropop's website: http://www.afropop.org/ (The link is under "INTERVIEWS" but you can do keyword search with "tango" or "Thompson.") I haven't read the book yet, but there seems to be plenty to learn from it.

5) A BEGINNERS WORKSHOP with LUCIA & YUVAL


DATE/HOUR: May 20th (Sat), 2006, 2:00-6:00pm
LOCATION: Memorial Room of the Ohio Union
COST: Prepaid prices: Student $20, Others $25; $25/$30 at the door
>>>Contact tango@osu.edu to register.

6) A BEGINNERS WORKSHOP with FRANCESCO & PAM

DATE/HOUR: June 3rd (Sat), 2006, 2:00-6:00pm
LOCATION: 5084 North High St. 43214
COST: $25/person
>>>Limited to 20 people and spots are quickly disappearing.
Please contact tcyinyang@aol.com to register.

Beginners Workshop with Francesco & Pam


Workshops are great ways to receive more intensive and thorough instructions. The workshops with Francesco and Pam have been very successful, and due to the high demand, we will be holding another one. Here is the 5th workshop that's coming in June.

BEGINNER WORKSHOP with FRANCESCO & PAM

DATE/HOUR
June 3rd (Saturday), 2006
2:00pm-6:00pm

LOCATION
5084 North High St. 43214
MAP

COST
$25/person

Registration upon prepayment required.
Contact tcyinyang@aol.com